MOST RECENT PRESS RELEASES:

July 11, 2022

Hoopa Valley Youth and Families Participate in Trinity River Clean Up, Learn About History of Protecting the River

July 8th, 2021

Local Hoopa Valley Youth, and Fight for the Klamath and Trinity Rivers Featured in Vogue Magazine.

Download PDF of Press Release Here:

For more immediate release: July 11, 2022

Hoopa Valley Youth and Families Participate in Trinity River Clean Up, Learn About

History of Protecting the River

 

For more information contact: Regina Chichizola, Save California Salmon: 541 951-0126

Danielle Frank, Save California Salmon: 707 798-0386

 

HOOPA, CALIFORNIA–Yesterday, dozens of Hoopa Valley tribal youth, their families and supporters participated in the 2022 Trinity River Clean Up. The clean up featured a three-hour trash pickup on land followed by a three-mile raft trip trash pickup through the Hoopa Valley.

 

During the Clean Up participants stopped at important cultural sites and representatives of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, Save California Salmon, and the Warrior Institute spoke about the state of the Trinity River and the history of fighting for tribal water and fishing rights on the Trinity, which is the largest tributary to the Klamath River system.

 

“It’s difficult to describe what the Trinity River means to our community and its people,” explained Chairman of the Hoopa Valley Tribe Joe Davis. “To say it means a lot is an understatement. To see an effort like this led by our youth is really something to be celebrated. I hope we can take these inspiring efforts and build off the positive momentum that’s been created. The Hoopa Valley Tribe is very thankful for all who volunteered their time and efforts.

 

The Trinity River Clean Up started more than 20 years ago led by the Hoopa Valley Tribe’s Fisheries Department, but for several years amidst the pandemic, the cleanup lacked participation and had fallen by the wayside until Hoopa youth activist and Save California Salmon Intern Danielle Frank decided it was time to bring the Clean Up back.

 

“Clean and healthy waterways play a vital role in our communities,” Frank explained. “They help our cultural resources, our children, our salmon, and our ceremonies thrive. I’m extremely happy to see our youth learning how to care and advocate for the rivers our people know as home.”

 

Danielle said the Clean Up is also an excellent opportunity to raise awareness and build appreciation for the river. She invited guest speakers because it is a really important time for people to fight for the Trinity River. Due to excessive diversions from the Trinity River reservoirs and California’s drought the Trinity River’s storage is the lowest in the state at 29 percent. This means the cold water pool that is relied upon to stop adult fish kills in the Klamath and Trinity Rivers may not be there to release this year.

 

Frank said the Hoopa and Yurok Tribes fought for these water releases and explained if reservoir storage is not protected when the reservoirs’ water is diverted to Central Valley agribusiness there will not be cold water to stop fish kills.

 

Frank was recently featured as a face of BIPOC youth activism in Vogue magazine as part of a spread on youth climate activists as part of the Tokala project. The project is spearheaded by creative director/stylist Marcus Correa and photographer Carlos Jaramillo, along with filmmaker Jazmin Garcia and the nonprofit Future Coalition’s Youth Direct Action Fund.

 

“The climate activism space is a very white-led space,” says Correa. “But POC communities are being disproportionately affected by climate change. There's so much strength in these communities, and these activists should be getting this celebrity treatment. We wanted to tell their story in a visual way that’s optimistic and uplifting.”

 

Save California Salmon will be hosting events with local Tribes and youth all summer including Tribal youth raft trips on the Klamath and Trinity Rivers on July 17 and 23, and a Salmon Protectors Canoe Camp in August after the Yurok Tribe’s Salmon Festival. They will also be co-hosting a public comment hearing on the State Water Resources Control Board’s Racial Equity Action plan on July 21 in Redding with the state water board. Information on these events can be obtained on their website or on their social media pages. Like and follow Save California Salmon on Facebook and Instagram.

Download PDF of Press Release Here:

For more immediate release: July 8th, 2021

 

Local Hoopa Valley Youth, and Fight for the Klamath and Trinity Rivers Featured in Vogue Magazine

 

For more information contact:

Regina Chichizola, Save California Salmon: 541 951-0126

Danielle Frank, Save California Salmon: 707 798-0386

 

Hoopa Valley, California- Yesterday, Vogue Magazine featured Hoopa Valley Tribal youth and Save California Salmon Youth Organizer, Danielle Frank, in a fashion spread and story about youth climate activists. Danielle was joined in the photo shoot and spread by Hoopa Valley and Yurok elders and cultural leaders, which took place on the Hoopa Valley Reservation.

 

The story is part of the Future Coalition’s Youth Direct Action Fund Tokala project, spearheaded by creative director/stylist Marcus Correa and photographer Carlos Jaramillo, along with filmmaker Jazmin Garcia.

 

“Frank is one of many inspiring young people who are the subject of a new series spotlighting a generation of BIPOC climate activists. The climate activism space is a very white-led space,” says Correa. “But POC communities are being disproportionately affected by climate change. There's so much strength in these communities, and these activists should be getting this celebrity treatment. We wanted to tell their story in a visual way that’s optimistic and uplifting.”

 

The article highlights Frank’s activism, and focuses heavily on the people of the Hoopa Valley and their connection to the Trinity River, along with the serious threats to their culture and fisheries, impacted by poor water quality from dams, diversions, and climate change. The story also speaks to the hope that Klamath River dam removal brings for the youth of the Klamath and Trinity Rivers, and the need for education reform in California.

 

Frank told Vogue: “The Trinity River runs through the heart of the Hoopa Indian Reservation, and our home is beautiful—it’s built around the river. We perform our boat dances on top of the river in canoes dressed in regalia. It's a world-renewing ceremony. It's meant to balance the good and the bad in the world.”

 

Vogue wrote, “For the past four or five years, the river has been very unhealthy…She sees protecting Hoopa’s main water source as crucial to her people’s survival—and key for the next generations to flourish, too: ‘We are a piece of the land, and it’s a piece of us; When it’s hurting, we’re hurting.”

 

Danielle explained to Vogue that her wor iss not only for the river, but for educational reform. Frank has been part of creating “Advocacy and Water Protection in Native California High School Curriculum” in collaboration with Save California Salmon, Humboldt State University, and local Tribes’. She has taught the curriculum in Humboldt County and Sacramento area schools, and helps to create and support water protector clubs in high schools. “My long term goals are to see the public education system change, to include the Indigenous perspective. It's going to take time to change the public education system—it's rooted in colonization, and full of lies.”

 

This Sunday, Frank is organizing the Trinity River clean up with Save California Salmon and the Hoopa Valley Tribe on the Hoopa Valley reservation. Along with cleaning up the river, the clean up features a raft trip and stops at cultural sites where Tribal speakers will discuss dam removal and the history of fighting for Tribal rights on the Klamath and Trinity Rivers. The clean up check in is at Pookie’s park on Loop Road between 8:30-11:30 with a raft trip and lunch to follow.

 

All Photos Available. Story at:

https://www.vogue.com/article/a-new-series-tokala-spotlights-bipoc-youth-climate-activists

PREVIOUS PRESS RELEASES:

January 5, 2022: More Than 50,000 People Join Tribes and Fishermen To Express Opposition to Sites Reservoir

Dec 08, 2021: Tribal Communities Organize To Stop Sites Reservoir, Provide Clean Water to Salmon and the Delta

Nov 01. 2021: Tribes, Fishermen, Conservationists Demand Action to Restore Flows in Klamath Tributaries

OCT 21, 2021: Request to Establish Instream Flows for the Scott and Shasta Rivers